In 2003 2000 people attended a Roscoe Lecture in Liverpool to hear Gerard Houllier. Today we mourn his death.

Dec 14, 2020 | Uncategorized

Gerard Houllier

Really sad to hear the news of Gerard Houllier’s death today.

In 2003 I invited him to give a Roscoe Lecture about what a great manager and great team could teach us about learning to live together and how to work together. 2000 people attended the lecture. Memorably he said he would be willing to put his job on the line to protect his players from racist abuse.

https://www.liverpoolecho.co.uk/news/liverpool-news/ill-put-job-line-stop-3551333

His lecture on the role of sport in citizenship, was delivered to 2,000 people in Liverpool Cathedral.

During the hour-long lecture, part of the John Moores University Foundation for Citizenship Roscoe Lecture series, Gerard Houllier shared some of his secrets of being a successful premiership manager which include listening to his players, having excellent training facilities, and being a strong leader who knew what he wanted of his team.

He also revealed his love of collecting books and his passion for reading them – always stretching his mind and learning more.

He will be well remembered in Liverpool and as his family mourn him they should know the great respect in which he was held.

May he rest in peace

Lord David Alton

For 18 years David Alton was a Member of the House of Commons and today he is an Independent Crossbench Life Peer in the UK House of Lords.

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