As the world marks the International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women on 25 November The Rights Practice has produced a new report entitled “Invisible Pain Sexual and gender-based violence in Xinjiang” – required reading by anyone who doubts the gravity of the suffering of Uighur people and the consequences for Uighur women.

Nov 25, 2020 | Uncategorized

The Rights Practice has produced a new report entitled “Invisible Pain Sexual and gender-based violence in Xinjiang” – which is required reading by anyone who doubts the gravity of the suffering of Uighur people and the consequences for Uighur women. They highlight intersecting forms of discrimination based on faith, ethnicity, age, class and gender, leaving Uighur women in the Xinjiang region enormously vulnerable to violence. There are reports of women being subjected to torture, rape and forced medication in detention. Other women have experienced forced abortions and sterilisation and the threat of sexual violence from officials during compulsory homestays. The violence is underreported and largely invisible to the outside world. The perpetrators appear to be public officials or persons acting with their consent or acquiescence.

As the world marks the International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women on 25 November, this report puts the spotlight on the situation of Uyghur women in Xinjiang.

Lord David Alton

For 18 years David Alton was a Member of the House of Commons and today he is an Independent Crossbench Life Peer in the UK House of Lords.

Social Media

Site Search

Recent Posts

For the Uyghurs, Genocide is a word which dares not speak its name. For the sake of women like Rahima Mahmut, Gulzira Auelkhan, Sayragul Sauytbay, and Ruqiye Perhat – whose heart-breaking, shocking, stories are recorded here – it’s time that the crime of genocide was given definition in the UK. On January 19th Parliament can use its voice and speak that name – insisting on justice for victims of Genocide and refusing to make tawdry trade deals with those responsible for the crime above all crimes.

For the Uyghurs, Genocide is a word which dares not speak its name. For the sake of women like Rahima Mahmut, Gulzira Auelkhan, Sayragul Sauytbay, and Ruqiye Perhat – whose heart-breaking, shocking, stories are recorded here – it’s time that the crime of genocide was given definition in the UK. On January 19th Parliament can use its voice and speak that name – insisting on justice for victims of Genocide and refusing to make tawdry trade deals with those responsible for the crime above all crimes.

For the Uyghurs Genocide is a word which dares...

Share This