Hazara minority communities face persecution and discrimination in Afghanistan and Pakistan – killings in Quetta this weekend demand urgent investigation.

Jan 4, 2021 | Uncategorized

People from the Hazara minority communities face persecution and discrimination in Afghanistan and Pakistan.

Predominantly Shia Muslims and they are targeted, marginalised, and denied basic rights and opportunities.

In Pakistan they live in remote areas such such as Quetta – and “out of sight, out of mind” leaves them ignored by much of the mainstream media. Without international interest local law enforcement agencies feel free to ignore them – and not merely ignoring complaints but even, in some cases, becoming collaborators .

One report, which did make it into the media, occurred this weekend and involves an attack on Hazara miners. Police video of the bodies revealed the miners were blindfolded and had their hands tied behind their backs before being shot.

https://www.latimes.com/world-nation/story/2021-01-03/is-gunmen-kill-11-minority-shiite-coal-miners-in-sw-pakistan

The Islamic State claims responsibility for the attack. Other reports allege collusion with the armed forces.

https://www.aninews.in/news/world/asia/pak-army-involved-in-genocide-of-hazara-shias-in-balochistan-pok-activist-after-killing-of-11-miners20210103224527

WARNING: Graphic content: https://twitter.com/fatimadar_jk/status/1345776449534402561?s=21

This is a shocking situation and needs urgent investigation by the Government of Pakistan – with those responsible being brought to justice.

Lord David Alton

For 18 years David Alton was a Member of the House of Commons and today he is an Independent Crossbench Life Peer in the UK House of Lords.

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