What Happened To The Promise? The Situation of Armenians in Nagorno-Karabakh in 2020. Watch the Westminster Symposium discussing the lessons to be learned from the Armenian Genocide.

Dec 21, 2020 | Uncategorized

What Happened To The Promise? The Situation of Armenians in Nagorno-Karabakh in 2020. Watch the Westminster Symposium discussing the lessons to be learned from the Armenian Genocide.

Watch the discussion here:

Published on 21 Dec 2020

The Armenian genocide took place between 1915 and 1923 when 1.5 million ethnic Armenians were arrested, deported or murdered by the Ottoman Empire. Currently, some 32 countries recognise the events as meeting the legal definition of genocide. The formal recognition of historic cases as genocide is not a matter of semantics. Such a formal recognition is crucial for survivors and their families in their efforts to move on. It is crucial for reconciliation and discovery of the truth. It is also crucial to deter similar crimes in the future, to ensure that such atrocities do not happen again. However, as in the case of Armenians, in 2020, we see early warning signs that the practices that targeted the communities over 100 years ago in the Ottoman Empire are being reinforced yet again. The panellists discuss the warning signs of mass atrocities and the needed responses to ensure that the Armenians are not let down yet again. Speakers include: Lord David Alton of Liverpool, Crossbench peer at the UK House of Lords, Patron of the Coalition for Genocide Response Baroness Caroline Cox, Crossbench peer at the UK House of Lords, Founder of HART Geoffrey Robertson QC, Founder and joint head of Doughty Street Chambers Gulnara Shahinian, human rights expert and author

Lord David Alton

For 18 years David Alton was a Member of the House of Commons and today he is an Independent Crossbench Life Peer in the UK House of Lords.

Social Media

Site Search

Recent Posts

Statement from  the UN High Commissioner for Refugees Filippo Grandi on the situation of Eritrean refugees in Ethiopia’s Tigray region: ” extremely troubled by the humanitarian situation”…”in spite of repeated requests, UNHCR and partners have not yet had any access to the Shimelba and Hitsats refugee camps”… I am very worried for the safety and well-being of Eritrean refugees in those camps”…”refugees who reached Addis Ababa are being returned to Tigray, some against their will.”

Statement from the UN High Commissioner for Refugees Filippo Grandi on the situation of Eritrean refugees in Ethiopia’s Tigray region: ” extremely troubled by the humanitarian situation”…”in spite of repeated requests, UNHCR and partners have not yet had any access to the Shimelba and Hitsats refugee camps”… I am very worried for the safety and well-being of Eritrean refugees in those camps”…”refugees who reached Addis Ababa are being returned to Tigray, some against their will.”

Statement from the UN High Commissioner for...

Tigray – parliamentary answers from the UK Government “We remain committed to the development of Ethiopia and its people, but we will continue to review our support in light of changing circumstances.”…” We are extremely concerned that humanitarian agencies, including the UN High Commission for Refugees (UNHCR), do not have access to refugee camps in Tigray. The UNHCR has, as a result, been unable to corroborate reports of the abduction and forced return of Eritrean refugees.”

Tigray - parliamentary answers from the UK...

Share This