Burma – Min Ko Naing

Dec 23, 2010 | Uncategorized

Min Ko NaingLord Alton of Liverpool asked Her Majesty’s Government:

    Whether they know the whereabouts and health of Min Ko Naing, the Burmese pro-democracy activist.[HL1884]

Baroness Scotland of Asthal: Our Embassy in Rangoon has obtained confirmation that Min Ko Naing is in Sittwe prison. He is said to be in reasonable health, is allowed outside exercise and regular family visits. He is one of an estimated 1,500 political prisoners in Burma. We take every opportunity to press for the immediate and unconditional release of all prisoners of conscience–for example, through ambassadorial representations in Rangoon and United Nations resolutions.
 

Lord David Alton

For 18 years David Alton was a Member of the House of Commons and today he is an Independent Crossbench Life Peer in the UK House of Lords.

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